Wait until you hear my crazy Baguazhang-Eagle-Dance/Archery theory

I find talking – as in real talking, not discussion forum kind of talking – with other martial artists always inspires some great thoughts. Recently, I was having a chat about some Eagle movements in Xing Yi and my venerable discussion partner noted that they were very similar to the Eagle Dance that Mongolian wrestlers do before a match.

Eagle dance.

My friend noted that the arm positions in the eagle dance are also quite similar to a lot of the arm positions in Baguazhang’s circle walking, like this one:

Baguazhang performed by Master Zhang Hong Mei.

Obviously, the performance is not exactly the same – the eagle dance can have music or a drum beat, but often doesn’t. However, music or not, it does have a rhythm, a beat, which are all things usually lacking in performances of Baguazhang. But Baguazhang does look a bit like a dance. It’s wonderfully twisty, mobile and changeable, but the Mongolian Wrestling dance is so much freer, it’s done with a smile, it’s clearly about having a good time. In contrast, Baguazhang is much more dower and serious. You could almost say it’s as close to dance as you could get if weren’t allowed to actually dance. You’re certainly not supposed to be smiling or showing emotions. I’m going to steal my friend’s hilarious comment about Baguazhang circle walking: “It’s almost like, ‘I want to boogie, but my Confucian culture won’t let me!‘”. 🙂

(As a side note, he also told me a theory about why there is no syncopation in classical Chinese music – it’s because in ‘ancient times’ drums were used to whip up the armies of the various tribes into a kind of pre-battle fighting trance, and when they wanted to unite the Han dynasty, they had to stop the tribes fighting. So, syncopation was removed from the music. I’ve got no proof for this theory, so just take it as an interesting idea, but banning drums it does sound exactly like the sort of thing Confucians would do.)

And that brings me onto my crazy Baguazhang/Mongolian Wresting/Archery theory. Dong Haichuan, the founder of Baguazhang and Yin Fu – his main student, spent 10 years together in Mongolia collecting taxes for Prince Su. This would have been during our Victorian times, so you can get an idea of the time period. Back in China the Dowager Empress Cixi sat on the throne in the Forbidden City.

10 years is a long time, and I find it impossible to believe that, being keen martial artists, that Dong and Yin didn’t have at least some exposure to Mongolian wrestling and/or religious practices, like Eagle dance, and that it could very well be reflected in the content of Baguazhang. I also wonder what all that exposure to a different culture to their own did for them.

Mill stone posture

Let’s look at another popular motif found in Baguazhang, the Mill store posture”.

Baguazhang performed by Master Zhang Hong Mei.

The key feature of the ‘mill stone posture’ is that the upper body and lower body are twisted away from each other in opposite directions as you walk the circle. If you’ve watched a lot of videos of Mongolian martial arts then it might remind you of something…

Another of the “manly arts” of Mongolian culture is horseback archery, which includes the ability to shoot an arrow behind you – the famous Parthian Shot, a horseback archery technique of feining a retreat then turning and shooting behind you 180 degrees once the enemy commit to chasing you.

Parthian Shot

The millstone standing posture of Baguazhang looks (to me) like some sort of training method for the Parthian Shot.

Here’s a video example of it being trained as a drill in Baguazhang:

Dong He Chuan was inside the imperial palace starting in 1864, the ruling Manchu’s (from the North) still had horseback archery as part of the military service exam. Is the simiarity of many Baguazhang postures to Mongolian martial arts a coincidence, or not? Who can say. The historical connection between Dong and Mongolia is there though.

And to finish things off, here’s a funny video I made with my kids when they were little. I wanted to boogie, but my kids wouldn’t let me! Ah, I miss those days, but I don’t miss the disturbed nights 🙂

Bagua circle waking with multiple attackers:

2 thoughts on “Wait until you hear my crazy Baguazhang-Eagle-Dance/Archery theory

  1. Richard –

    A common thought on the costume the wrestlers wear (and is worn in eagle dance) is that it exposes the breasts so that no female and sneak in and beat the men! I take that with a pinch of salt though. It has the air of ‘old wives tale’ about it. The Eagle Dance I think is more connected to animism and various Mongol spirt dances. Mongol culture is inherently Shamanic, both indigenous shamanism and a stream coming from Tibet flavoured by Buddhism. Perhaps it was that culture that shaped Baguazhang. Again, walking in a circle is a bog-standard shamanic practice. If you’re interested Damon and I did an episode about the famous painting “Along the River During the Qingming Festival, ” – https://www.spreaker.com/user/9404101/19-the-rainbow-bridge

  2. I think your observation of commonalities between disparate arts is a good one. As the center kingdom of the world, China has been a cultural nexus for millennia. Mongolian influence probably pre-dates to the Yuan Dynasty. The famous painting, Along the River During the Qingming Festival, depicts wrestling similar to Mongolian style from the Song Dynasty.

    More recently, General Qi Jiguang (1560) recorded the philosophy fo the Mill Stone Posture in two postures of his empty-hand chapter, Turn to Ride the Dragon and Ambush Posture. As a response to Qi’s writings, the first turn to the right in Chen Taijiquan’s Jingang Dao Dui can also lead one into the Mill Stone posture depending on the stillness of the hands and the degree of the turn. https://brennantranslation.wordpress.com/2019/08/31/qi-jiguangs-boxing-classic/

    While I always thought the Eagle Dance was to demonstrate that the wrestler bore no weapons, I think your correlation with Chinese Through-the-Back techniques might hold some merit, a relationship lost in ritual on Mongolia’s part.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s